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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be a pluralistic country where religion is a bridge to cooperation rather than a fissure between people. this is about an hour 20. >> good evening, everyone and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my u.s. best friend, eboo patel. i've had a wonderful time reading this book, and am very excited about having this conversation with him and then drawing you into that conversation. one of the delights about his book is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had many when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have a small breakfast, and then have a time with -- [inaudible] one of my favorite poets. and i thought it was really wonderful if we all could have kind of a moment of censuring around eboo reading one of his favorite poems. how does that sound? >> all right. thank you for the invitation to thank you all for being here. so, this is a poem that actually first heard where rumi is buried in turkey. come, come whoever you are. wanderer, worshiper, lover of reading but it doesn't matter. ho
the building of a religion. in the first two parts, with the help of scholars and historians, we tried to reconstruct his times, and how, after his death, a small jewish sect began to spread the word. tonight, how that story was told, and how a faith overcame an empire. ( music playing ) >> narrator: jewish resistance was not completely snuffed out after the sack of jerusalem. rebel fighters held out for four more years. the jewish historian josephus, who had taken part in the war, recounted the story: >> there was a fortress of very great strength not far from jerusalem which had been built by our ancient kings. it is called masada. >> the rock of masada, one of the most glorious places in all israel, became the major refuge point for some of the most extremist elements opposing rome. the zealots, and their most ardent supporters, fled right in the middle of the war to masada. >> ( dramatized ): here had been stored a mass of corn amply sufficient to last for years, an abundance of wine and oil. there was also found a mass of arms of every description hoarded up by the king and suffic
, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty sign
of the basic values, like freedom of expression, religion, so we are going to fight it, and one of our first platforms will be to abolish or of the very least amend the constitution. -- or at the very least abolished -- amend the constitution. >> they expect the crisis to end soon. >> it is not against the regime. that is very bad for the country -- country. we are losing almost 50 million american dollars a day, and the egyptian government is not strong enough. >> many egyptians are tired of the political upheaval. looking to bring civility. others are afraid the country could be moving towards an islamic state. egypt is deeply divided about its future. bbc news, cairo. >> the former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is said to be spending christmas in the hospital. he was admitted two weeks ago because of a lung infection, but while in the hospital, he was also treated for gallstones, and doctors say he is not quite ready to be allowed home. we resent this update from johannesburg. >> nelson mandela was admitted to the hospital, and now, it appears he will not be discharged in tim
people, as he put it, to build a more fraternal society, allowing religions to make their contribution. the vatican's relations with beijing reached a new low earlier this year with the detention by chinese authorities of a new roman catholic bishop of shanghai, which had previously than approved. he gave his blessing in 65 languages. [cheers and applause] >> although he sometimes walks with a stick and is tushed on a traveling platform to save his strength when he fish yates at masses, pope benedict wears his 85 years relatively well. at times his voice may be slightly hoarse, but his determination to continue in office is unshaken by increasing age. "bbc news," rome. >> at least 27 people have been killed in a plane vash in southern kazakhstan. it was considering -- carrying several people. they said the plane had up and only fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell
of religion in a second republic, in a postrevolutionary egyptian state. and there were some new elements introduced that hadn't existed in previous constitutions. there was a larger role carved out for religion with a number of articles in the constitution. that had been controversial, not so much for what they did but insomuch as i think more than as much as they were in what they allowed for. so you had, for example, article 2 is the standard iteration of the role of sharia -- the principles of sharia in defining legislation, but you also had article 4, which allowed for a role of the al-azhar university for the first time, which is an unelected body, a religious body that issues religions opinions. and so this role was very vague, but it was enshrined in the constitution. you also had probably the most controversial is article 219, which attempted to define what principles of sharia actually meant, and in doing so i think the wording, of course, is very vague and i would say it doesn't open -- it doesn't create a religious state, but it opens the door to a religious state that could b
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary. so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. one of the most dangerous parts in that constitution, that it opened the door for many controversial school of religious thoughts to seep through the legislative process and undermine the authority of the judiciary. >> warner: the constitution was approved by 64% of the national vote, but only a third of eligible voters had turned out. and in major cities like cairo, majorities voted "no." this morning, those divisions were still apparent in cairo. >> ( translated ): it will certainly lead to stability. we can now begin to move forward. investment can begin to come into egypt. what more do people want? >> ( translated ): we are very sad and we never wanted the situation to be this way. we never wanted just one political group to rule. we wanted there to be unity. >> warner: for now, legislative power rests with the country's upper house of parliament, which is dominated by islamists. it was seated today. >> ( translated ): with regards >> warner: parliame
claims that are baseless. what concerns me about morsi is they wrap themselves around in religion and i'm a muslim and they do not own islam. and what concerns me about this particular constitution is that it was written hurriedly but old ultra conservative men. and women who work with the brotherhood have internalized their own subjugation. >> i appreciate your time. coming up, will armed guards and police officers in schools nationwide become a reality? hey sis, it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the clear choice. okay, i'm outta here. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office sup
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
down in fall of 2008. shibani: that was huge. several hundred points. >> that will get some religion in to politicians in washington and they will get their act together and make a resolution. certainty is what we are looking for. not that we need the fiscal cliff result one way or the other but we need certainty. we need policy in place so people and corporations know how to spend money. dennis: certainty promised is pretty bleak. two million more job losses, the nation would go into recession again. doesn't have to be the end of the world that politicians want to avoid. widened to of view say we're going over the cliff, there's a chance they get this thing done? [talking over each other] shibani: no one is doing any work today. >> things can happen. we have seen things happen on a short time from. i was amazed when i woke up this morning checking news feeds that everyone was enthusiastic about the deal coming together. absolutely nothing from an evidence point of view would support that between today and three days ago but you are right that things do happen on a short time frame.
and discuss the role of religion in president everzone's life and death. but first president obama's legacy. >> i think as long as the language is spoke en in the corner of the globe, as churchill said, people will be writing about barack obama because of the historic achievement in a country as we've been talking about built on slavery, drif within racism. for a man named barack hussein obama to become president at, what was he 46 at the time, a remarkable achievement. and so that part of the story is done in a way. and the question for him now, which is totally fascinating, of course, is, okay, you're part of history. but what's the second paragraph? and right now the second paragraph is preventing great depression after financial crisis. that's not the kind of second paragraph presidents who live in history have. it's got to be more positive than that. it's got to be more active. >> health care? >> it depends. you know, i mean, if -- it's usually important, obviously, if it ultimately leads to a sustainable system where everyone has access to health care and it's seen as moral right, the
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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